My World
oupacademic:


"Galvani’s Commentary also triggered new studies of animal electricity. Some investigators stimulated the central nervous system itself, not just the peripheral nerves serving the muscles. Although he had been unable to get muscles to contract by stimulating the brain electrically, Galvani’s nephew, Giovanni Aldini (1762—1834), was successful with the exposed brains of oxen, cows, sheep, dogs, and horses. With electricity, he could make the recently decapitated head of an animal dilate its nostrils, move its tongue, shake its ears, and roll its eyes. Aldini even collected fresh human heads at the foot of the guillotine and bodies for dissection from the scaffold. In a series of well-publicized experiments, he showed that he could evoke facial grimaces, jaw movements, and eye opening by passing current through the exposed brains of recently executed criminals.”

Stanley Finger and Mark B. Law discuss the 18th and 19th century experiments to reanimate the dead using electricity in 'Karl August Weinhold and His “Science” in the Era of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein: Experiments on Electricity and the Restoration of Life’, in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences.   
Image credit: Electrical science display,Bakken Museum, Minneapolis, Minnesota, by j bizzie, via Wikimedia Commons.

oupacademic:

"Galvani’s Commentary also triggered new studies of animal electricity. Some investigators stimulated the central nervous system itself, not just the peripheral nerves serving the muscles. Although he had been unable to get muscles to contract by stimulating the brain electrically, Galvani’s nephew, Giovanni Aldini (1762—1834), was successful with the exposed brains of oxen, cows, sheep, dogs, and horses. With electricity, he could make the recently decapitated head of an animal dilate its nostrils, move its tongue, shake its ears, and roll its eyes. Aldini even collected fresh human heads at the foot of the guillotine and bodies for dissection from the scaffold. In a series of well-publicized experiments, he showed that he could evoke facial grimaces, jaw movements, and eye opening by passing current through the exposed brains of recently executed criminals.”

Stanley Finger and Mark B. Law discuss the 18th and 19th century experiments to reanimate the dead using electricity in 'Karl August Weinhold and His “Science” in the Era of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein: Experiments on Electricity and the Restoration of Life’, in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences.  

Image credit: Electrical science display,Bakken Museum, Minneapolis, Minnesota, by j bizzie, via Wikimedia Commons.

New york

New york